A Tea Dress, Orchids, and Modern Art Deco

If you’ve been following my blog, then you know that I’m enamored by the 1940s, but another one of my favorite eras is that in which Art Deco thrived: the 1920s through the 1930s.

Art Deco is a visually enticing style that originated in France during the 1920s and was inspired by Cubism. It was incorporated into various mediums, such as architecture, interior design, fashion, transportation, and my favorite: jewelry.

Art Deco lost it’s popularity at the end of World War II and was replaced by modernism, but today there are classic examples of this stunning style, such as this Art Deco Vintage Tea Dress from Lady V London.

The Tea Dress imitates the most iconic 1950s dress style: the “New Look” full-skirted dress with a signature fitted bodice and voluminous skirt flaring out from the waistline. The skirt is designed to come down to the knee even when wearing a petticoat- a classic staple of the conservative nature of fashion during the 50s.

The neckline of the “New Look” dress could be v-neck, sweetheart, boat-neck, or curved, such as those on Lady V London’s Tea Dresses. The back of the dress dips down into a deep v-shape and the waist can be adjusted using two straps that can be tied in a bow. But the best part about the design is that it has pockets! What is it about having pockets that automatically makes a dress infinitely more enticing?

The Tea Dress is made from stretchable cotton, so not only does it breathe, it also gives which adds to it’s comfort. It’s not lined, which I love because spring and summer can get quite hot here in Boston. Because of the material, its machine washable, on a delicate cycle, and should be air dried (how I’d love to have an actual clothing line to dry gorgeous dresses like this one on).

All of Lady V London’s Tea Dresses come in UK sizes 8-22. Each size chart provides measurements for the exact dress you’re looking at, so be sure to check even if you’ve ordered from them before.

I’m wearing a UK 12, despite normally being a UK 10. My waist is exactly between the two sizes, so I chose the larger just to be safe. Upon retrospect, I probably would have fit the UK 10 considering the way the garment stretches. Fortunately, the ties in the back allowed me to fit the waist perfectly to my body.

The Art Deco Vintage Tea Dress is priced at £50 (about $63 USD), as are all of Lady V London’s Tea Dresses, which is fabulous for the quality.  Shipping starts at £3.95 within the U.K., they ship to over 100 countries worldwide, and offer free shipping to orders over £150.

While I wouldn’t say that this is a true Art Deco print, it certainly captures the more abstract designs of that era with a modern twist, and that’s exactly what I love about it. So if you’re on the hunt for a vintage meets modern dress, look no further than the Art Deco Vintage Tea Dress from Lady V London. And if you want a similar style with a longer skirt, check out their Hepburn collection, you can catch me there staring at the Teal Cupcake print.

Dress: Tea Dress – Art Deco Vintage c/o Lady V London | Hair flower: Double Cymbidium Orchid in Deep Red and Black – Sophisticated Lady Hair Flowers | Shoes: Swing Along Heel in Noir – ModCloth
Special thanks to Georgia from Lady V London for this fantastic opportunity.
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26 thoughts on “A Tea Dress, Orchids, and Modern Art Deco

  1. I love that pattern and cut of dress! I have a hard time finding dresses like this, so i’m so happy I ran across this post!

    Like

  2. LVL is one of my favorite brands – this dress has caught my eye before so I am pumped to see you in it! You look fantastic and that hair flower was the perfect accessory to pair it with. Lovely!

    Like

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