The BBRBF Book Club: Red, Blue, and the Lasso of Truth

Hello and welcome to another edition of the BBRBF Book Club! It’s been a while since I’ve posted a review and the reason is because I couldn’t quite bring myself to write about our last book; in fact, it was a struggle to even finish the book. That’s not to say it wasn’t good, it just hit too close to home in regards to medical conditions.

Fortunately, this month’s book focuses on one of my favorite comic book characters: Wonder Woman. Here is the plot summary of The Secret History of Wonder Woman by  Jill Lepore:

A riveting work of historical detection revealing that the origin of one of the world’s most iconic superheroes hides within it a fascinating family story—and a crucial history of twentieth-century feminism.

The Secret History of Wonder Woman is a tour de force of intellectual and cultural history. Wonder Woman, Lepore argues, is the missing link in the history of the struggle for women’s rights—a chain of events that begins with the women’s suffrage campaigns of the early 1900s and ends with the troubled place of feminism a century later.

If there’s one thing that I can say I’m without a doubt passionate about, it’s women’s rights, so when I saw the opportunity to read about one of the most historically powerful, albeit fictional, women I was overjoyed. Wonder Woman was inspired by several influential figures throughout the women’s suffrage movement, including Sadie Holloway and Margaret Sanger, a famous birth control activist.

Interestingly enough, the creator of Wonder Woman, William Moulton Marston, was a bit of a misogynist despite being a committed feminist (weird, I know). He simultaneously lived and fathered children with two women, while participating in “cult of female sexual power” sex parties that were organized by his aunt. Perhaps misogynist isn’t the correct word, because his wife and lovers all willing participated in these sorts of events, instead let’s just emphasize the fact that he believed in “free love” outside of the restrictions of marriage (as did his wife, Sadie Holloway).

Marston’s exposure to suffragist culture led him to depict Wonder Woman as bound by chains in many editions of the comic; this being a common theme throughout suffragist imagery and publications. His goal was to make her the heroine of a new age in which women ruled. He, in fact, believed that the day would come when women would lead, as opposed to men (I, myself, wouldn’t mind seeing this some day).

After Marston’s death, at the young age of 54, his publishers ignored his original intent of keeping her as a “Progressive Era feminist” and began depicting Wonder Woman as a traditional housewife. Having been turned over to a new writer, she would be characterized as a babysitter or even a fashion model.

Despite these later depictions of her after Marston’s death, Wonder Woman has remained the greatest female superhero of all time. She’s extremely strong and agile, beautiful, cunning and intelligent and a symbol of empowerment to women everywhere. I highly recommend reading this book, as it goes into much further detail as to the people and events that inspired her. As for me, I’ll be anxiously awaiting the new Wonder Woman film coming out this summer.

And, as always, don’t forget to check out all of the other fabulous book clubbers’ opinions and inspired outfits: Sara (In a Nutshell), Kat (The Miss Information Blog), Kristina (The Eyre Effect), Noelle (The Classy Junk), Laci (Laci Fay), and Justyna (Hazel & Honey)!

Next month we will be reviewing Caraval by  Stephanie Garber, so stick around!

blog-signature

Classic Necklines, 1940s Slang, and a Dolled Up Dame

To me, there is nothing more beautiful than the draping of a 1940’s dress over the female form. Designers at that time seem to have catered their gowns towards women of all shapes and sizes, ensuring that every dame could feel dolled up. This philosophy has persisted through the ages within the vintage-reproduction world, particularly within one of my favorite online boutiques: Doll Me Up.

Doll Me Up is a one-stop shop for some of the most popular 1940’s and 1950’s reproduction clothing brands, such as Hell Bunny, Voodoo Vixen and Lindy Bop. They’re wide selection makes it easy for gals to explore styles from different decades and find what they like best. Being completely enamored by the 1940’s, I couldn’t take my eyes off of the Ashcroft Dress.

The most eye-catching feature of the Ashcroft is the keyhole neckline that’s iconic of the 1940’s. The signature keyhole was made by cutting a triangular piece of fabric from the chest-area, ensuring that the point of the triangle was facing up. The remaining fabric, just below the neck, was fitted against the collarbones and either secured by a string or left loose. The Ashcroft took a more modern spin and secured the two pieces of fabric with an adorably detailed button.

The sleeves showcase another classic 1940’s design: the length of a straight sleeve with the flow of a cap sleeve. The bodice secures around each curve with seven gorgeous buttons, while the skirt flows out into the quintessential A-line. Tie the whole look together with a vibrant coral sash that matches perfectly with the tiny floral detail decorating the fabric.

The Ashcroft is made from a light-weight polyester that’s machine washable. While the bodice is lined, the skirt is not which gives the dress the ability to flow flawlessly in the breeze (one of my favorite traits of the dress).

Doll Me Up refers to any size above a medium as “lovely,” which plays into their theme of size-inclusive beauty. The Ashcroft is available from US XS to 4X Lovely. I’m wearing a size M, which is my normal size, and it fits like a glove.

The Ashcroft retails for $87.99 and comes in two prints: the one pictured and the Ivory Beauty Print, each one more beautiful than the last. Shipping starts at $5.99 within the U.S., $8.99 internationally, and free for orders over $150.

The Ashcroft incorporates all of the most popular styles of the 1940’s into one stunning piece. It’s gorgeous design makes it perfect for any occasion and work appropriate with some pinup flare. So if, like me, you’re keen on becoming a 1940’s dreamboat, then look no further than the Ashcroft from Doll Me Up.

Dress: Ashcroft Dress c/o Doll Me Up | Shoes: Brown Leather Lace Up Oxfords- Office
Special thanks to Krista from Doll Me Up for this swinging opportunity.

blog-signature

Red, Blue and Yellow Florals and the Vintage “New Look”

When I first ventured into the world of vintage fashion, I was completely lost. I had no idea where to find true vintage, or even reproductions, other than Etsy or my local Goodwill. Through hours of searching the internet, which can either be productive or utterly unsuccessful, I happened to stumble across Lindy Bop and I’ve never looked back since.

Lindy Bop offers a wide array of reproduction styles at budget-friendly prices. Their collection includes 1940s silhouettes, 1950s novelty prints, and 1960s twin sets, making it the perfect one-stop shop for all your favorite midcentury styles. So when offered the chance to review a piece from their newest release, and spread more knowledge of this fabulous brand, I jumped at it.

I own several pieces from Lindy Bop, many of them I’ve featured in previous posts, but nothing has caught my eye quite like the Francine Blue Rose Stripe Swing Dress. It is the quintessential 1950s “New Look” full-skirted dress. As noted in a previous post (here), the “New Look” dress had several variations that designers could play with: different necklines, sleeves, collars, fabrics, etc. The Francine incorporates a gorgeous sweetheart neckline with ruched sleeves that go half-way down the arm. Although the ruching is more of a modern design, the length of the sleeves is a classic staple of the 1950s.

Like any good “New Look” dress, the Francine has a cinched waist, that can be emphasized with it’s signature red belt, and a full circle skirt that balloons out from the waistline. The skirt comes down to the knee and contains pockets (any dress or skirt with pockets is a winner in my book)!

Although it can be worn without a petticoat, if you’re looking for the classic silhouette of the 1950s, then I recommend pairing it with a 26″ or 28″ petticoat (which you can also find here on Lindy Bop’s website).

The Francine is made from machine-washable cotton, so it breathes during those hot spring and summer days, and is fully lined. The fabric is one of the most beautiful prints I’ve seen on a reproduction dress. Within each yellow section of the dress are large blue flowers accompanied by smaller red and white ones. Each layer of yellow is separated from each blue layer by a delicate and feminine swirling line that goes around the entire dress. And the cherry on top is the red belt that ties the whole thing together.

On the U.K. site, the size range is UK8-26, while on the U.S. site it is XS-6XL, which emphasizes their philosophy of creating vintage-inspired pieces for pinups of all sizes. I’m wearing a UK12, despite normally being a UK10 (or US Small). They happened to be out of UK10 for this design and I came to the conclusion that I could manage with a UK12 (yes, I love the dress that much). Fortunately, Lindy Bop provides measurements for each piece, which helped in my decision. The waist is a bit big, but the belt eliminated that problem and while the sleeves felt a little loose, you can’t tell when looking at them.

The Francine retails for £34 or $44 on the U.S. site, which I would pay any day for a dress this beautiful. They have sales fairly frequently and signing up for their newsletter will inform you of them. If you see something on sale, snag it fast because it’ll be gone before you know it! Delivery within the U.K. starts at £3 and $7 within the U.S with free delivery over £85 or $125.

I was taken with this dress from the moment I saw it, but I had no idea how much more beautiful it would be in person. On top of it all, I can’t help but feel like Snow White in this dress, and who doesn’t love feeling like a princess.

So if you’re searching for an absolutely stunning floral Easter or spring dress, look no further than the Francine from Lindy Bop. Be sure to check out their “New In” section  for their latest styles. As for me, I’ll be drooling over this perfect reproduction of a 1950s “Bell Dress.”

Dress: ‘Francine’ Blue Rose Stripe Swing Dress c/o Lindy Bop | Shoes: Urban Outfitters
Special thanks to Natasha from Lindy Bop for this breathtaking opportunity.

blog-signature